What Is A Wiki Site

Cunningham and Bo Leuf designed WikiWikiWeb, the first wiki in 1995,
to be an open, collaborative community Website where anyone can contribute.
Since then, programmers have created many wiki-inspired programs and wiki Websites.
Most of these stay true to the goal of simplicity. Wikis can be used for a large
variety of tasks, from personal note-taking to collaborating online, creating an
internal knowledge base, assembling an online community, and managing a
traditional website. The possibilities might make wikis seem like a daunting system,
but commitment to simplicity makes wiki tools a breeze.

What's so Good About Wikis?
Wikis Simplify Editing Your Website
* Wikis Use Simple Markup
* Wikis Record Document Histories
* Creating Links Is Simple With Wikis
* Creating New Pages Is Simple With Wikis
* Wikis Simplify Site Organization
* Wikis Keep Track of All Your Stuff
* Many Wikis are Collaborative Communities
* Wikis Encourage Good Hypertext

Erialbania Lopez


A wiki is a website that uses wiki software and it allows the easy
creation and editing of interlinked Web pages
, using
a simplified markup language, within the
browser.

Wikis are often used to create collaborative websites,
to power community websites, and for note taking.

Wikis are used in business to provide intranet and knowledge management systems.
Wikis have been described as "the simplest
online database that could possibly work.

Wikis allow everyday users to create and edit
any page in a website, and it encourages the use
of the Web and promotes the creation of content
by unprofesional users.
Guarina Molina


A wiki is a website that uses wiki software, allowing the easy creation and editing of any number of interlinked Web pages, using a simplified markup language or a WYSIWYG text editor, within the browser. Wikis are often used to create collaborative websites, to power community websites, and for note taking. The collaborative encyclopedia Wikipedia is one of the best-known wikis. Wikis are used in business to provide intranet and knowledge management systems. Ward Cunningham, the developer of the first wiki software, WikiWikiWeb, originally described it as "the simplest online database that could possibly work."

(Katherine Pena)


A wiki is a collaboration tool - a web site where the pages can be changed and INSTANTLY published using only a web browser (no programming required). Pages are automatically created and linked to each other.

Details
Collaborate using modifiable web pages
Automatic web page linking and creation
Changes are INSTANTLY published

(Luis Rafael Acta)


WikiWikiWeb, the first wiki, was designed in 1995, to be an open, collaborative community Website where anyone could contribute. Programmers have created many wiki-inspired programs and wiki Websites. Most of these are really simple. Wikis can be used for a large variety of tasks, from personal note-taking to collaborating online, creating an internal knowledge base, assembling an online community, and managing a traditional website.As wikis work like hypertext databases, you can organize your page however you want.

Benefits of Wikis:

  • Wikis Simplify Editing Your Website
  • Wikis Record Document Histories
  • Creating Links Is Simple With Wikis
  • Creating New Pages Is Simple With Wikis
  • Wikis Simplify Site Organization
  • Many Wikis are Collaborative Communities: The original wiki allows anyone to click the Edit button and change the Website.

Source: http://www.sitepoint.com/article/what-is-a-wiki/2/
-Claudia Franjul-


The simplest online database that could possibly work, Wiki is a piece of server software that allows users to freely create and edit Web page content using any Web browser. Wiki supports hyperlinks and has a simple text syntax for creating new pages and crosslinks between internal pages on the fly.
Wiki is unusual among group communication mechanisms in that it allows the organization of contributions to be edited in addition to the content itself. Like many simple concepts, "open editing" has some profound and subtle effects on Wiki usage. Allowing everyday users to create and edit any page in a Web site is exciting in that it encourages democratic use of the Web and promotes content composition by nontechnical users.

(info from: //http://wiki.org/wiki.cgi?WhatIsWiki//)

(Betsy Rodriguez)


A wiki is a website that uses wiki software, allowing the easy creation and editing of any number of interlinked Web pages, using a simplified markup language or a WYSIWYG text editor, within the browser. Wikis are often used to create collaborative websites, to power community websites, and for note taking. The collaborative encyclopedia Wikipedia is one of the best-known wikis. Wikis are used in business to provide intranet and knowledge management systems. Ward Cunningham, the developer of the first wiki software, WikiWikiWeb, originally described it as the simplest online database that could possibly work.

(R.B.M)


Wiki is a piece of server software that allows users to freely create and edit Web page content using any Web browser. Wiki supports hyperlinks and has a simple text syntax for creating new pages and crosslinks between internal pages on the fly.

(M.Pelletier)


WikiWikiWeb was the first site to be called a wiki. Ward Cunningham started developing WikiWikiWeb in 1994, and installed it on the Internet domain c2.com on March 25, 1995. It was named by Cunningham, who remembered a Honolulu International Airport counter employee telling him to take the "Wiki Wiki" shuttle bus that runs between the airport's terminals. According to Cunningham, "I chose wiki-wiki as an alliterative substitute for 'quick' and thereby avoided naming this stuff quick-web.

Cunningham was in part inspired by Apple's HyperCard. Apple had designed a system allowing users to create virtual "card stacks" supporting links among the various cards. Cunningham developed Vannevar Bush's ideas by allowing users to "comment on and change one another's text". In the early 2000s, wikis were increasingly adopted in enterprise as collaborative software. Common uses included project communication, intranets, and documentation, initially for technical users. Today some companies use wikis as their only collaborative software and as a replacement for static intranets, and some schools and universities use wikis to enhance group learning. There may be greater use of wikis behind firewalls than on the public Internet.
On March 15, 2007, wiki entered the online Oxford English Dictionary

(Nick Jimenez)


A wiki is a website that uses wikipedia software, allowing the creation and editing of any number of interlinked Web pages, using a simplified markup language or a WYSIWYG text editor, within the browser.Wikis are often used to create websites, to power community websites, and for note taking. The collaborative encyclopedia Wikipedia is one of the best-known wikis.Ward Cunningham, the developer of the first wiki software, WikiWikiWeb, originally described it as the simplest online database.

(J.Mckinney)


A wiki is a website that uses wiki software, allowing the easy creation and editing of any number of interlinked Web pages, using a simplified markup language or a WYSIWYG text editor, within the browser. Wikis are often used to create collaborative websites, to power community websites, and for note taking. The collaborative encyclopedia Wikipedia is one of the best-known wikis. Wikis are used in business to provide intranet and knowledge management systems. Ward Cunningham, the developer of the first wiki software, WikiWikiWeb, originally described it as "the simplest online database that could possibly work."

"Wiki" (English pronunciation: /wiːkiː/) is a Hawaiian word for "fast". "Wiki" can be expanded as "What I Know Is," but this is a backronym.

working-the-wiki-way.jpg

source

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(Vicente Gomez)


Wiki is a piece of server software that allows users to freely create and edit Web page content using any Web browser. Wiki supports hyperlinks and has a simple text syntax for creating new pages and crosslinks between internal pages on the fly.

Wiki is unusual among group communication mechanisms in that it allows the organization of contributions to be edited in addition to the content itself.
(Haresh Khemlani)=)


Wiki is a piece of server software that allows users to freely create and edit Web page content using any Web browser. Wiki supports hyperlinks and has a simple text syntax for creating new pages and crosslinks between internal pages on the fly.

Wiki is unusual among group communication mechanisms in that it allows the organization of contributions to be edited in addition to the content itself.

Like many simple concepts, "open editing" has some profound and subtle effects on Wiki usage. Allowing everyday users to create and edit any page in a Web site is exciting in that it encourages democratic use of the Web and promotes content composition by nontechnical users.

(Kimberly Dominguez)


A wiki is a Web-based application that allows people to add, remove, edit and change content through a browser. The ease of interaction makes wikis an effective tool for collaboration. Wikis can be considered a content management system. Developed wikis are online collaborative communities that lend themselves well to continuous editing and refinement of content. They are best at aggregating and distilling shared knowledge (including article evolution). Content reflects a blend of voices. Wikis can work well in organizational cultures where there is a high level of trust.

(Kanya Duran)


A wiki is a website that includes the collaboration of work from many different authors. Users can add, remove, and edit every page using a web browser. It's so terrifically easy for people to jump in and revise pages that wikis are becoming known as the tool of choice for large, multiple-participant projects.(The first wiki creator, Ward Cunningham, named the site after a chain of buses in Hawaii; Wiki means "quick" in Hawaiian.)

(Genesis A.L.)


From what i've searched a wiki is one of the simplest web pages that allows you to be kind of an administrator, because you can edit it or change it any time you want without having the knowledge needed to write an artical. Although there is still an administrator.

(Luis Restituyo)


A wiki is a Web site that allows users to add and update content on the site using their own Web browser. This is possible thanks to Wiki software that runs on the Web server. Wikis are mainly created mainly by site visitors. A great example of a large wiki is the Wikipedia, a free encyclopedia in many languages that anyone can edit. The term "wiki" comes from the Hawaiian phrase, "wiki wiki," which means "super fast." I can imagine that if you have thousands of users adding content to a Web site on a regular basis, the site could grow "super fast."
http://www.techterms.com/definition/wiki

(Gabriela Jimenez)


A wiki is a software that has difficult problems but simple solutions. Wiki is an english term for "quick" or "fast" in Hawaiian. The first wiki designed in 1995 was a collaborative community website were anyone can contribute. It was designed by two men named Ward Cunninghan and Bo Leuf. Wikis can be used for lots of things, it may be for a personal note-taking, creating an internal knowledge base, assembling an online community, and managing a traditional website.

Some good things about wikis are that they simplify editing your website, it uses simple markup, record documents history, you can easily create a new link or pages, they simplify site organization, they keep track of all your stuff, are collaborative communities, and encourage good hypertext.
http://www.sitepoint.com/article/what-is-a-wiki/

(Gabriela Elias)


A wiki, being a software for creating and editing pages, it is enabled to be used by a number of people at once (usually in a group invited by the site manager). There is no need for knowledge of HTML or any other type of markup language. Anyone can add to or edit pages in a wiki — it is completely egalitarian. Anyone can create new wiki pages simply by creating a new link with the name of the page. Pages are connected not hierarchically, but by hyperlinks between pages.

According to the creator of Wiki, Ward Cunningham, wikis can be identified by the following characteristics:

- "A wiki invites all users to edit any page or to create new pages within the wiki Web site, using only a plain-vanilla Web browser without any extra add-ons."
- "Wiki promotes meaningful topic associations between different pages by making page link creation almost intuitively easy and by showing whether an intended target page exists or not."
- "A wiki is not a carefully crafted site for casual visitors. Instead, it seeks to involve the visitor in an ongoing process of creation and collaboration that constantly changes the Web site landscape."

(Lily Sanchez)


Wiki is a piece of server software that allows users to freely create and edit Web page content using any Web browser. Wiki supports hyperlinks and has a simple text syntax for creating new pages and crosslinks between internal pages on the fly.Wiki is unusual among group communication mechanisms in that it allows the organization of contributions to be edited in addition to the content itself.

(Laura I.)


A wiki (sometimes spelled "Wiki") is a server program that allows users to collaborate in forming the content of a Web site. With a wiki, any user can edit the site content, including other users' contributions, using a regular Web browser. Basically, a wiki Web site operates on a principle of collaborative trust. The term comes from the word "wikiwiki," which means "fast" in the Hawaiian language. A wiki allows a visitor to the "wikified" Web site to edit the content of the site from their own computer. Visitors can also create new content and change the organization of existing content. The simplest wiki programs allow editing of text and hyperlinks only. More advanced wikis make it possible to add or change images, tables, and certain interactive components such as games.

(Luis Liu)


Different people have different ideas about what a wiki really is, but whatever angle you look at it, a wiki is software that handles complex problems with simple solutions.

What's so Good About Wikis?

* Wikis Simplify Editing Your Website: Each page on a wiki has an Edit link. If you want to change something on the page, click the link, and the wiki will display a simple editing screen. When you finish making changes, submit them by clicking a button, and, Voila! Your changes show up on the Website.
* Wikis Use Simple Markup: Even for geeky types like me, thinking about HTML and formatting gets in the way of good, clear writing. Wikis solve this problem by writing the HTML for you — you only need to learn a few simple markup rules. These rules are designed to make wiki markup easy to write and read by real people.
* Wikis Record Document Histories: If you make a mistake, don't worry. A good wiki will save plenty of old copies of your pages and will let you revert to an older version of a page. In fact, many Wikis will display a comparison, called a diffˆ, which shows you the exact changes you have made to your page over time.
* Creating Links Is Simple With Wikis: Wikis store all your Website's content in an internal hypertext database. The wiki knows about every page you have and about every link you make. If you use a wiki, you don't have to worry about the location of files or the format of your tags. Simply name the page, and the wiki will automatically create a link for you.
* Creating New Pages Is Simple With Wikis: Wikis let you link to pages that don't yet exist. Click on a link that points to a nonexistent page, and the wiki will ask you for initial content to put in the page. If you submit some initial content, the wiki will create the page. All links to that page (not just the one you clicked) will now point to the newly-created page.
* Wikis Simplify Site Organization: As wikis work like hypertext databases, you can organize your page however you want. Many content management systems require you to plan classifications for your content before you actually create it. This can be helpful, but only if what you want to convey fits a rigid mould. With a wiki, you can organize your page into categories if you want, but you can also try other things. Instead of designing the site structure, many wiki site creators just let the structure grow with the content and the links inside their content. But you don't have to have it either way. I do all three on my own site. Visitors can navigate the site by following a storyline, drilling down through a hierarchy, or they can just browse with the natural flow of the internal links. Without the wiki, such complexity would be a nightmare. Now that I use a wiki, I also find my site structure easier to manage than when I used a template system and a set of categories.
* Wikis Keep Track of All Your Stuff: Because a wiki stores everything in an internal hypertext database, it knows about all your links and all your pages. So it's easy for the wiki to show back links, a list of all the pages that linking to the current page. Since the wiki stores your document history, it can also list recent changes. Advanced wikis like the Wikipedia can even show a list of recent changes to pages that link to the current page.
* Many Wikis are Collaborative Communities: The original wiki allows anyone to click the Edit button and change the Website. While this may seem odd, many wikis are able to do this successfully without major issues in terms of vandalism. Remember, the wiki stores the history of each page. For each vandal, there are probably ten people who actually need the information that was there before, and who will take the time to click the button and reset the page to its former contents. Many of the wikis handle this challenge differently. Some are completely open, some restrict access, and one even has a democratic error/vandalism reporting system. How you deal with this challenge depends on what you plan to use the Wiki for, as we'll see.
* Wikis Encourage Good Hypertext: In my recent article, Caffeinate Your Hypertext, I wrote that wikis are the purest form of hypertext available on the Web today. Many wikis sport features that make hypertext geeks drool, but the features aren't the real reason wikis make great hypertext tools. They succeed because they make writing hypertext elegantly and easy. Effective Wiki writers don't have to be geeks. They just need to be able to type.

It might be difficult to imagine a simple product that does everything I describe. So why not try it for yourself? Start out on your own computer; you don't even need to install a Web server in order to play with a wiki. Notebook, which acts like a personal wiki for keeping track of notes and other ideas, runs as a regular computer application, and is available on multiple operating systems. It's great for managing your brain.
(REBECA EVERTZ)


A wiki is a website that allows easy creation and editing of any number of interlinked Web pages, using a simplified markup language within the browser. Wikis are often used to create collaborative websites, to power community websites, and for note taking. An internet source encyclopedia called wikipedia is one of the best-known wikis. Wikis are used in business to provide knowledge management systems. Ward Cunningham, the developer of the first wiki software, described WikiWikiWeb as "the simplest online database that could possibly work."

Characteristics of a Wiki Page:
* A wiki invites all users to edit any page or to create new pages within the wiki Web site, using only a plain-vanilla Web browser without any extra add-ons.

* Wiki promotes meaningful topic associations between different pages by making page link creation almost intuitively easy and showing whether an intended target page exists or not.

* A wiki is not a carefully crafted site for casual visitors. Instead, it seeks to involve the visitor in an ongoing process of creation and collaboration that constantly changes the Web site landscape.

wiki.gif 450

SalunaChow.


What is a Wiki???
A Wiki is a type of website that allows users to add, remove, or otherwise edit and change most content very quickly and easily.

Uses of Wiki in education:
Wikis are being adopted as a way of constructing knowledge across a broad range of subject areas. Its unique collaborative feature provides many opportunities for education. Here are some examples that wikis might be used in the classroom.

  • Class or School Communication Site:A wiki can serve as the primary class web site. The quick and easy free-form editing and linking features put a wiki in a distinct class as opposed to simplified class announcement systems or relatively static, threaded class discussion forums.
  • Collaborative Class Site/Knowledge Base:A wiki can be used as the focal point for a topical community related to your class content. This could mean a general site about a topic, or a focused resource containing material, links, and writing created through student research.
  • Assignments/Portfolios:Assignments can be posted to a wiki, which provides an additional potential benefit of allowing for peer review. Students can use the wiki to create a portfolio of selected work as well as an archive of transitional work.
  • Group Projects:Given the characteristics of wiki building and collaboration, it is a natural environment for group work of various kinds-an elusive learning activity in the distance education environment. Gabriela Herrera :3

What is a Wiki?
A Wiki enables documents to be authored collectively in a simple markup language using a web browser. "Wiki wiki" means "super fast" in the Hawaiian language, and it is the speed of creating and updating pages that is one of the defining aspects of wiki technology. Generally, there is no prior review before modifications are accepted, and most wikis are open to the general public or at least to all persons who also have access to the wiki server. The Campus Wiki module enables participants to work together on web pages to add, expand and change the content. Old versions are never deleted and can be restored.

KeNdRiCk


{Emily Perez}

¿¿¿What is a Wiki???

Wiki is a piece of server software that allows users to freely create and edit Web page content using any Web browser. Wiki supports hyperlinks and has a simple text syntax for creating new pages and crosslinks between internal pages on the fly.

What's so Good About Wikis?

Wikis Simplify Editing Your Website: Each page on a wiki has an Edit link. If you want to change something on the page, click the link, and the wiki will display a simple editing screen.
Allowing everyday users to create and edit any page in a Web site is exciting in that it encourages democratic use of the Web and promotes content composition by nontechnical users.

Wikis Record Document Histories: If you make a mistake, don't worry. A good wiki will save plenty of old copies of your pages and will let you revert to an older version of a page.

Creating Links Is Simple With Wikis: Wikis store all your Website's content in an internal hypertext database. The wiki knows about every page you have and about every link you make.

Creating New Pages Is Simple With Wikis: Wikis let you link to pages that don't yet exist. Click on a link that points to a nonexistent page, and the wiki will ask you for initial content to put in the page. If you submit some initial content, the wiki will create the page.

Wikis Simplify Site Organization: As wikis work like hypertext databases, you can organize your page however you want. Many content management systems require you to plan classifications for your content before you actually create it.

Wikis Keep Track of All Your Stuff: Because a wiki stores everything in an internal hypertext database, it knows about all your links and all your pages. So it's easy for the wiki to show back links, a list of all the pages that linking to the current page.

Many Wikis are Collaborative Communities: The original wiki allows anyone to click the Edit button and change the Website. While this may seem odd, many wikis are able to do this successfully without major issues in terms of vandalism.

Wikis Encourage Good Hypertext:Many wikis sport features that make hypertext geeks drool, but the features aren't the real reason wikis make great hypertext tools. They succeed because they make writing hypertext elegantly and easy.

wiki.org/wiki.cgi?WhatIsWiki
www.sitepoint.com/article/what-is-a-wiki/


http://www.webguild.org/images/1211573010wiki.gif

-A wiki invites all users to edit any page or to create new pages within the wiki Web site, using only a plain-vanilla Web browser without any extra add-ons.

-Wiki promotes meaningful topic associations between different pages by making page link creation almost intuitively easy and showing whether an intended target page exists or not.

-A wiki is not a carefully crafted site for casual visitors. Instead, it seeks to involve the visitor in an ongoing process of creation and collaboration that constantly changes the Web site landscape.

(Eliecer Cruz)


-(Kenny Gomez) What is a Wiki site?

The simplest online database that could possibly work.

Wiki is a piece of server software that allows users to freely create and edit Web page content using any Web browser. Wiki supports hyperlinks and has a simple text syntax for creating new pages and crosslinks between internal pages on the fly.

Wiki is unusual among group communication mechanisms in that it allows the organization of contributions to be edited in addition to the content itself.

Like many simple concepts, "open editing" has some profound and subtle effects on Wiki usage. Allowing everyday users to create and edit any page in a Web site is exciting in that it encourages democratic use of the Web and promotes content composition by nontechnical users.

http://wiki.org/wiki.cgi?WhatIsWiki


Wiki is a piece of server software that allows users to freely create and edit Web page content using any Web browser. Wiki supports hyperlinks and has a simple text syntax for creating new pages and crosslinks between internal pages on the fly.

Wiki is unusual among group communication mechanisms in that it allows the organization of contributions to be edited in addition to the content itself.

Like many simple concepts, "open editing" has some profound and subtle effects on Wiki usage. Allowing everyday users to create and edit any page in a Web site is exciting in that it encourages democratic use of the Web and promotes content composition by nontechnical users.

http://wiki.org/wiki.cgi?WhatIsWiki


(Nicholas De Oleo)

Wiki is a piece of server software that allows users to freely create and edit Web page content using any Web browser. Wiki supports hyperlinks and has a simple text syntax for creating new pages and crosslinks between internal pages on the fly.

Wiki is unusual among group communication mechanisms in that it allows the organization of contributions to be edited in addition to the content itself.

Like many simple concepts, "open editing" has some profound and subtle effects on Wiki usage. Allowing everyday users to create and edit any page in a Web site is exciting in that it encourages democratic use of the Web and promotes content composition by nontechnical users.


(Rafael Cabrera)

A wiki is a website that uses wiki software, allowing the easy creation and editing of any number of interlinked Web pages, using a simplified markup language or a WYSIWYG text editor, within the browser. Wikis are often used to create collaborative websites, to power community websites, and for note taking. The collaborative encyclopedia Wikipedia is one of the best-known wikis. Wikis are used in business to provide intranet and knowledge management systems. Ward Cunningham, the developer of the first wiki software, WikiWikiWeb, originally described it as "the simplest online database that could possibly work.


(Eduardo De Los Santos)

A wiki is a website that uses wiki software, allowing the easy creation and editing of any number of interlinked Web pages, using a simplified markup language or a WYSIWYG text editor, within the browser Wikis are often used to create collaborative websites, to power community websites, and for note taking. The collaborative encyclopedia Wikipedia is one of the best-known wikis. Wikis are used in business to provide intranet and knowledge management systems. Ward Cunningham, the developer of the first wiki software, WikiWikiWeb, originally described it as "the simplest online database that could possibly work."


(Liango Liu)

A wiki allows a group of people to collaboratively develop a Web site with no knowledge of HTML or other markup languages. Anyone can add to or edit pages in a wiki — it is completely egalitarian. Anyone can create new wiki pages simply by creating a new link with the name of the page. Pages are connected not hierarchically, but by hyperlinks between pages.

According to the creator of Wiki, Ward Cunningham, wikis can be identified by the following characteristics:

"A wiki invites all users to edit any page or to create new pages within the wiki Web site, using only a plain-vanilla Web browser without any extra add-ons."
"Wiki promotes meaningful topic associations between different pages by making page link creation almost intuitively easy and by showing whether an intended target page exists or not."
"A wiki is not a carefully crafted site for casual visitors. Instead, it seeks to involve the visitor in an ongoing process of creation and collaboration that constantly changes the Web site landscape."

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